social-teaist
Have you ever heard the phrase cockblocking? You know, you’re at a bar, talking to a girl, and what happens? Her less attractive friend comes over and ruins everything. Cockblock. Well I have to tell you something guys: I have been the less attractive friend, and you were NOT cockblocked. I was following orders from my better-looking friend that she did not wanna fuck you. …Girls have two signals for their friends: ‘I’m gonna fuck him’ and ‘HELP.’

Amy Schumer [x] (via rashaka)

The number of “get me out of here” tactics women have developed and shared to help each other escape from overly-insistent-to-borderline-predatory dudes in public places should probably be enough evidence of the existence of rape culture all on its own.

(via madgastronomer)

YES

(via ellakrystina)

I especially like how, in the majority of cases, you don’t have to verbally communicate what your signals are to other women. I’ve had women I didn’t even know come save me. Literally every woman recognizes the “Dear god, help me” facial expression, and knows exactly what they should do. We don’t get a handbook for this. We don’t have a sit-down nail polish party where we talk about a standardized woman code for preventing creepers. It’s just part of being a woman.

BUT LOL RAPE CULTURE DOESN’T EXIST.

(via eastberlin)

Yup. I’ve definitely taken strangers by the arm and pulled her aside to go, “Oh my GOD it’s you! How ARE YOU?!? It’s been so long!” and then been like “hey I could overhear that guy who wouldn’t leave you alone so I figured I’d give you an out” and then see their VISIBLY RELIEVED expressions. This is part of girl code, because rape culture is that pervasive.

(via thebicker)

I once had a girl sit on my lap and say “hey baby” after she witnessed a guy (who was easily 20+ years older than me) hitting on me and harassing me for my number even after I told him I was taken. After he got up and left she asked if I was okay. I couldn’t thank her enough times, I even bought her a drink.

(via castielsmiles)

We have done this. In fact, we are this. Because we are asexual and we don’t like alcohol so we never drink, we have gone with friends to parties/places where our sole job was to keep an eye out for everyone and be the permanent ‘aggressive man-sheild.’ Not one of our female friends has ever questioned this or found it all strange. In fact, often once they realized we were willing to do it, it would be pre-arranged. Every guy friend we ever did this in front of or tried to explain to looked flabbergasted. They had no idea that this was a) an intentional thing, b) a planned ahead thing, or c) universal.

Rape culture is the fact that every woman understands this. Male privilege is the fact that no guy on earth seems to know or understand.

(via cractasticdispatches)

I’ve been asked to pretend to be my friend’s girlfriend every time we go out at night, just because she wears clothes that show off her curves and guys won’t leave her alone. They only back off when I put my arm around her and act as if we’re together romantically, and sometimes not even then.

(via zaataronpita)

i once ran interference for a friend, only to receive the unwanted advances myself. he wouldn’t back off until my (male) friend literally wrapped me up in his arms and acted as if he was my S.O.

(via miljathefailcat)

It happens online too. A guy I know started Facebook-stalking me after a recent interaction, and my roommate immediately got on Facebook and told him she was my girlfriend. He thankfully backed off after that.

I can’t count the number of times I have pretended to be somebody’s girlfriend or sister in a bar when a guy wouldn’t leave her alone. Both with friends and strangers.

(via feministsupernatural)

After reading these, I feel like taking a shower. Because I’m the designated driver pretty much every time, not being a big fan of alcohol, but I rarely, if ever, intervene. And yeah, I’m small and pretty physically weak, but I could put my foot down verbally if it came down to it. I’m just too scared.

(via harperhug)

You’re probably scared of confronting the guys.  And you should be.  That’s what this whole post is about.  Rape culture is so prevalent and socially accepted as the rule of the land that if someone confronts a guy and tells him directly to back off, someone is getting hurt.  That’s why all of the testimonies here are examples of how to deflect.  How women all learn methods of pulling a woman away from a situation with a guy who isn’t allowing her to say no, by making up some lie that will get the guy to let her go without sending him into a rage and deciding to teach you both a lesson about knowing your place and submitting to rape culture.  Men are dangerous in these situations because all of society backs them up as just a nice guy who deserves a chance, and vilifies any woman who refuses to give him a chance.  Women are not allowed to say no.  So other women have to rescue the women saying no and pull them away with some made up excuse.  Otherwise the situation will escalate and the ones who get hurt are always the women. 

(via coffeegleek)

Women absolutely have to learn rescue tactics for each other, but it’s kind of funny how we describe really obvious facial expressions and body language as “secret signals.” The reality is that women telegraph disinterest in these aggressive men, making it super obvious, but men choose to ignore it. Total strangers who are just sitting nearby or happen to glance their way will be able to see that the woman isn’t interested, but the guy making the advances is somehow oblivious? Unlikely.

(via smitethepatriarchy)

And perceived physical power of the woman doesn’t matter either, I have had to do this for other rollergirls. Even after bouts where they are bruised, sweaty, and partying with a bunch of other built women in the same jersey.

(via polerin)

One time, some friends and I were having dinner at a reasonably fancy restaurant when I suddenly noticed the other girl in the group, who’d gone to the bathroom, had been away for ages. I decided to go see if she was all right. The bathroom was at the back, outside and out of view, and when I went out there, lo, there were two hella drunk guys who’d cornered her for a clearly unwelcome chat, putting themselves between her and the door back into the main restaurant, both ignoring her defensive, unrelaxed body language which SCREAMED “I do not want to be here”. So I walked up, loudly announced that the others had wanted to tell her something, and brought her back inside, whereon she heaved a huge sigh of relief and thanked me for rescuing her. She’d tried to extricate herself politely several times, but either the guys hadn’t noticed or were wilfully ignoring her, so she’d been stuck there humouring them for twenty minutes. For the first time, the idea of girls going to the bathroom in packs made sense to me: so that individuals don’t get cornered and propositioned by douchebags on the way to and from their group. 

(via fozmeadows)

3262 - all those commenters who point out that everyone else, literally everyone else can read this, but the person(s) hitting on you miss it entirely.  I’ve had other guys, random guys, rescue me, not just women, and I’ve done it for other women at times, though I’m admittedly very bad at reading this sort of thing, at reading body language in general.

(via portraitofasmile)

It had honestly never occurred to me that cockblocking meant anything other than deliberately occupying a guy’s attentions to stop them turning that unwanted attention on someone else.

(via left-to-say)

social-teaist
Women who are fat are said to have ‘let themselves go.’ The very phrase connotes a loosening of restraints. Women in our society are bound. In generations past, the constriction was accomplished by corsets and girdles…. Women today are bound by fears, by oppression, and by stereotypes that depict large women as ungainly, unfeminine, and unworthy of appreciation…. Above all, women must control themselves, must be careful, for to relax might lead to the worst possible consequence: being fat.

“Letting Ourselves Go: Making Room for the Fat Body in Feminist Scholarship,” by Cecilia Hartley (via loniemc)

(via female-only)

social-teaist
Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.
Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)
social-teaist
owlmylove:

FRIENDLY FUCKIN’ REMINDER: WHAT WE CALL "THE TONY AWARDS" WAS ORIGINALLY "THE ANTOINETTE PERRY AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN THEATRE", NAMED AFTER THE CO-FOUNDER AND CHAIRWOMAN OF THE AMERICAN THEATRE WING.
THE AWARDS FOR ACTRESSES WERE ORIGINALLY SILVER COMPACTS, BUT SOMEONE DECIDED THIS WAS TOO EFFEMINATE AND SLAPPED THE COMPACT’S DESIGN IN THE MIDDLE OF OUR MODERN AWARD- THAT SPINNY SILVER MEDALLION WAS ORIGINALLY USED FOR CHECKING LIPSTICK.
ANOTHER REMINDER: I KNEW NONE OF THIS UNTIL TODAY. DON’T TOLERATE FEMALE ERASURE.

REMEMBER HER NAME.
ANTOINETTE FUCKING PERRY.

owlmylove:

FRIENDLY FUCKIN’ REMINDER: WHAT WE CALL "THE TONY AWARDS" WAS ORIGINALLY "THE ANTOINETTE PERRY AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN THEATRE", NAMED AFTER THE CO-FOUNDER AND CHAIRWOMAN OF THE AMERICAN THEATRE WING.

THE AWARDS FOR ACTRESSES WERE ORIGINALLY SILVER COMPACTS, BUT SOMEONE DECIDED THIS WAS TOO EFFEMINATE AND SLAPPED THE COMPACT’S DESIGN IN THE MIDDLE OF OUR MODERN AWARD- THAT SPINNY SILVER MEDALLION WAS ORIGINALLY USED FOR CHECKING LIPSTICK.

ANOTHER REMINDER: I KNEW NONE OF THIS UNTIL TODAY. DON’T TOLERATE FEMALE ERASURE.

REMEMBER HER NAME.

ANTOINETTE FUCKING PERRY.

social-teaist

zebablah:

spectaclesinscript:

stereoculturesociety:

DailyPBO: The President & The Standing Rock Sioux Reservation - June 2014
The crowd to President Obama: “We love you President Obama! You’re our hero!”
President Obama: “I love you back!”
Obama became only the fourth sitting president to visit an Indian reservation. Attending with the First Lady, it was a truly inspiring event at the Cannon Ball Pow Wow Grounds in Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The Native American community was bursting with pride over the president’s visit and when he spoke Lakota during his speech, they were completely moved. It was a wonderful day for a community that never (and I mean NEVER) gets the respect they deserve. Bravo, Mr. President.
For more reactions, check the Twitter hashtag: #PrezRezVisit

Only the fourth? Of ALL the sitting presidents that have come and gone? Dang.

the

fourth

social-teaist
Many of us have preconceived notions about people’s accents. We find Western European accents—French, British, Castilian Spanish, Italian—relatively appealing, while Asian and Mexican accents are experienced as unintelligible or offensive… if an employee speaks French well and English only moderately well, we aren’t bothered. however, if Filipinos, for example, speak Tagalog to one another at work, the assumptions are that they are purposefully excluding English-speakers, that they are not trying to learn English, and that they don’t care. A mean-spirited quality is attributed to the behavior.

Frances E. Kendall, Understanding White Privilege (via thenekoqueen)

White supremacy doesn’t regard non-white languages as real languages, it regards them as deviant forms of communication reduced to broad ethnic strokes (“Indian”, “Asian”, “African”) that is unacceptable because it is seen as an affront to white/euro hegemony.

(via notafuckingwizard)

broken english is only considered cute when you have an european accent, if you’re from south america or any other nonwhite continent or country you’re seen as stupid and illiterate… it’s funny because the same people that complains about broken english refuses to learn another language

(via we-are-star-stuff)